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  1. #1
    Senior Member Switch's Avatar
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    Stocking for a nano tank

    hi pete i found this on a site tried to send by PM but it didn't fit lol i find it good info so what do you think???


    HI MATE HOW ABOUT THIS AS A STICKY ITS FOR A NANO TANK!!!! took it out or a marine section think it could help if anyone wants to look into it really good information

    most dartfish would be alright (fire fish and purple fire fish being most commonly seen)

    whiteray/blackray shrimp gobys (Stonogobiops spp)

    twinspot goby (Signigobius biocellatus)

    Neon Goby (Gobiosoma oceanops)

    sharknose goby (Gobiosoma evelynae)

    clown gobys like the yellow clown goby (Gobiodon okinawae)

    rainford's goby (Amblygobius rainfordi)

    other shrimp goby's less than about 10cm (yep i got bored of writing them out from me book)

    Bicolour blenny (Ecsenius bicolor)

    sixline wrasse, fourline wrasse, eightline wrasse

    all flasher wrasse

    avoid twinspot coris they get to 4ft long!!

    avoid all damsels (and clownfish) other than percula/ocellaris/pink skunk/maldives clownfish

    angelfish - only dwarfs:
    potters
    flame
    herald's
    lemonpeel
    coral beauty
    cherub

    Edit: Avoid tangs as they all get too big for nano tanks IMO

    banggai cardinal (Pterapogon kauderni)
    Pajama cardinal (Sphaeramia nematoptera)

    can keep longnose hawk fish but may eat shrimp and dartfish type fish

    flame hawkfish will eat snails and crabs as will most other hawkfish

    jawfish are ok but at least 3" of sand must be provided for burrow construction

    Assessor species will generally be ok

    royal gramma's are good (Gramma loreto) MUST NOT BE CONFUSED WITH THE ROYAL DOTTYBACKi have seen fish shops label these as royal gramma's, but they are far more aggressive and will eat small shrimp

    avoid all other dottybacks as they are highly aggressive to similar fish and each other, possible exception being the orchid dottyback, may pick on firefish and goby's

    Chalk bass (Serranus tortugarum)

    Lanturn bass (Serranus baldwini)

    avoid scorpion fish, waspfish, frog fish and all lion fish as they will eat all your other fish, the only lion fish that could fit in the tank on its own would be the twinspot (Dendrochirus biocellatus)

    you could even keep some of the smaller moray eels in this size tank but it'd be the only fish in it

    could keep common seahorses (Hippocampus kuda) and pipefish (only one pipefish and maybe a pair of seahorses with no corals at all just the dead twig type ones) but these are both very delicate and picky eaters that shouldn't be tried by anyone but very experienced marine keepers

    other possible seahorses:
    Thorny seahorse (H. histrix)
    Lined seahorse 9H. erectus)
    Dwarf seahorses (H. zosterae)

    this all depends on what sort of set-up you want though



    Inverts
    shrimp crabs snails etc

    i'd personally go for 1 cleaner shrimp and 1-2 peppermint shrimp in a 10-15 Imp. gallon tank, or you could have some sexy shrimp if your fish aren't large enough to eat them (most will eat them)

    a couple of hermit crabs for every 15 Imp. gallons, but just becareful of the soft corals as the crabs can damage them and may pull snails out of the shells (killing them) so they can have the shell

    mithrax crabs (Mithrax sculptus) are great for eating algae, one or 2 of these would be better than hermits

    snails, probably start of with a couple of turbo snails and star snails (Astraea) and maybe go up to 5 or 6 per 15 Imp. gallons as a maximum if you have enough algae growth to support them

    starfish
    avoid blue linka's like the plague few last more than a year so shouldn't be sold IMO
    avoid green brittle stars (Ophiarachna incrssata) they aren't called the green death for nothing, they'll eat all yor fish and shrimp etc

    brittle/serpent stars may be ok while small though

    all star fish get too big eventually, and sand sifters may keep the sand turned over but they eat all life out of it them starve to death

    if you buy a feather duster worm then you must feed phytoplankton and zooplankton (rotifers) on a regular basis, if you wanted you could culture your own with 2L drinks bottles and a flourescent tube or 2 provideing 24/7 lighting for the phytoplankton, you then feed some of these cultures to the rotifers and some to the tank, the rotifers can be fed to the tank you must feed the phyto plankton with certain fertilisers. if you do this then you could keep a scallop as well

    no urchins, octopi, squid, cuttlefish, lobsters, mantis shrimp, nudibranchs, oysters, clams and jellyfish



    corals (not my favourite of things lol)

    most soft corals like toadstools, fingers, leathers etc will be ok, star polyps, xenia etc will be fine, mushrooms will be ok this is as long as you have bright T5 lighting.

    suncorals can be hidden under a overhang as they dont use light, but must be fed daily to keep them healthy and growing

    avoid anemones, they'd need a little higher lighting IMO and are more trouble than they are worth

    aboid all hard corals again IMO as they only really do best under MH lighting, IMO also avoid all sponges

    about it really, just monitor your calcium and magnesium levels as they use these elements, Ca should be about 450 and Mg about 1500

  2. #2
    Senior Member Switch's Avatar
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    now that i read what edd has said i think i will let him adjust this to what he thinks lol :P

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    hi pete i found this on a site tried to send by PM but it didn't fit lol i find it good info so what do you think???


    HI MATE HOW ABOUT THIS AS A STICKY ITS FOR A NANO TANK!!!! took it out or a marine section think it could help if anyone wants to look into it really good information

    most dartfish would be alright (fire fish and purple fire fish being most commonly seen) - i disagree, they are fairly delicate fish

    whiteray/blackray shrimp gobys (Stonogobiops spp)

    twinspot goby (Signigobius biocellatus)

    Neon Goby (Gobiosoma oceanops)

    sharknose goby (Gobiosoma evelynae)

    clown gobys like the yellow clown goby (Gobiodon okinawae)

    rainford's goby (Amblygobius rainfordi)

    other shrimp goby's less than about 10cm (yep i got bored of writing them out from me book)

    Bicolour blenny (Ecsenius bicolor)

    sixline wrasse, fourline wrasse, eightline wrasse - disagree

    all flasher wrasse - disagree

    avoid twinspot coris they get to 4ft long!!

    avoid all damsels (and clownfish) other than percula/ocellaris/pink skunk/maldives clownfish - smaller damsels are ok on their own, as are a pair of smaller clowns, but only in a tank at least 60litres

    angelfish - only dwarfs: - id say no to all angels
    potters
    flame
    herald's
    lemonpeel
    coral beauty
    cherub

    Edit: Avoid tangs as they all get too big for nano tanks IMO - i agree completely

    banggai cardinal (Pterapogon kauderni)
    Pajama cardinal (Sphaeramia nematoptera)

    can keep longnose hawk fish but may eat shrimp and dartfish type fish

    flame hawkfish will eat snails and crabs as will most other hawkfish

    jawfish are ok but at least 3" of sand must be provided for burrow construction - no, these require better conditions than a nano can provide

    Assessor species will generally be ok

    royal gramma's are good (Gramma loreto) MUST NOT BE CONFUSED WITH THE ROYAL DOTTYBACKi have seen fish shops label these as royal gramma's, but they are far more aggressive and will eat small shrimp - again, a nano isnt big enough for this fish, they need lots of crevices and places to explore

    avoid all other dottybacks as they are highly aggressive to similar fish and each other, possible exception being the orchid dottyback, may pick on firefish and goby's - agree completely here! they are aggresive little buggers and eat shrimp

    Chalk bass (Serranus tortugarum) - hmmm not 100% sure on this one

    Lanturn bass (Serranus baldwini) - or this one

    avoid scorpion fish, waspfish, frog fish and all lion fish as they will eat all your other fish, the only lion fish that could fit in the tank on its own would be the twinspot (Dendrochirus biocellatus) - very true! even though lionfish are my fave fish ever, they are in no way suitable for a smaller tank than at least 240litres! the smaller fuzzies can be kept in smaller tanks, but still at least 180litres. plus they eat any fish that will fit in their mouth.

    you could even keep some of the smaller moray eels in this size tank but it'd be the only fish in it - snowflake morays start small but will grow rapidly, they are very messy and also can escape from almost any hole so securing lid can be tough on smaller tanks

    could keep common seahorses (Hippocampus kuda) and pipefish (only one pipefish and maybe a pair of seahorses with no corals at all just the dead twig type ones) but these are both very delicate and picky eaters that shouldn't be tried by anyone but very experienced marine keepers - in a 60litre tank you can happily keep a pair of smaller horses. kuda is easiest to get, but not easiest to keep. H.Babouri are the easiest to keep and breed, but are also one of the larger species. seahorses are best left alone until you have grasped the more advanced part of keeping fish and corals. seahorses are delicate and require a very specific diet and setup. they cant be kept with fish very well as they cannot compete for food due to their slowness. Im looking to start breeding H.Barbouri later this year, so ill definately be making a journal

    other possible seahorses: - see above
    Thorny seahorse (H. histrix)
    Lined seahorse 9H. erectus)
    Dwarf seahorses (H. zosterae)

    this all depends on what sort of set-up you want though



    Inverts
    shrimp crabs snails etc

    i'd personally go for 1 cleaner shrimp and 1-2 peppermint shrimp in a 10-15 Imp. gallon tank, or you could have some sexy shrimp if your fish aren't large enough to eat them (most will eat them) - sounds ok

    a couple of hermit crabs for every 15 Imp. gallons, but just becareful of the soft corals as the crabs can damage them and may pull snails out of the shells (killing them) so they can have the shell

    mithrax crabs (Mithrax sculptus) are great for eating algae, one or 2 of these would be better than hermits - agreed i love mine!

    snails, probably start of with a couple of turbo snails and star snails (Astraea) and maybe go up to 5 or 6 per 15 Imp. gallons as a maximum if you have enough algae growth to support them - snails are fine and good to have

    starfish - Id say generally a no to any starfish. you are guaranteed to end up with loads anyways lol. the smaller grey and bright coloured dotty ones will be on live rock and multiply rapidly i have about 300 in my reef now
    avoid blue linka's like the plague few last more than a year so shouldn't be sold IMO
    avoid green brittle stars (Ophiarachna incrssata) they aren't called the green death for nothing, they'll eat all yor fish and shrimp etc

    brittle/serpent stars may be ok while small though

    all star fish get too big eventually, and sand sifters may keep the sand turned over but they eat all life out of it them starve to death - agreed

    if you buy a feather duster worm then you must feed phytoplankton and zooplankton (rotifers) on a regular basis, if you wanted you could culture your own with 2L drinks bottles and a flourescent tube or 2 provideing 24/7 lighting for the phytoplankton, you then feed some of these cultures to the rotifers and some to the tank, the rotifers can be fed to the tank you must feed the phyto plankton with certain fertilisers. if you do this then you could keep a scallop as well - feather dusters aregood, but you will need decent flow and regular food

    no urchins, octopi, squid, cuttlefish, lobsters, mantis shrimp, nudibranchs, oysters, clams and jellyfish - definately agreed!



    corals (not my favourite of things lol)

    most soft corals like toadstools, fingers, leathers etc will be ok, star polyps, xenia etc will be fine, mushrooms will be ok this is as long as you have bright T5 lighting.

    suncorals can be hidden under a overhang as they dont use light, but must be fed daily to keep them healthy and growing

    avoid anemones, they'd need a little higher lighting IMO and are more trouble than they are worth

    aboid all hard corals again IMO as they only really do best under MH lighting, IMO also avoid all sponges

    about it really, just monitor your calcium and magnesium levels as they use these elements, Ca should be about 450 and Mg about 1500 - id say avoid all hard corals, and only stick to easier soft corals. xenia, star polyps, kenya tree, mushrooms, zoas and ricordias are all perfectly fine and very nice corals
    I think thats covered most of it

  4. #4
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    Jul 2019
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    Panama
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    Stocking for a nano tank

    Would the new fluval edge work as a nano reef tank? If yes, what all additional equiptment would have to be purchased? I have never done reef tanks before, or saltwater none the less and wanted to get some basic help on this.Thanks,nate

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